lalouver:

CENTRAL PARK SHOWCASE FOR CHINESE SCULPTOR
The Doris C. Freedman Plaza, at the entrance to Central Park on Fifth Avenue at 60th Street, is becoming something of a United Nations for artists. Over the years the plaza has been a temporary home to sculptural installations by German and Brazilian artists. There have also been examples of work by well-known figures from England, Poland and Japan. Now a sculptor from China will occupy the plaza — a first, according to Nicholas Baume, director and chief curator of the Public Art Fund.
From Oct. 28 through Feb. 20, four monumental bronze sculptures by the Beijing-based artist Sui Jianguo will command that space. The works, called “Blind Portraits,” are part of a series from his spontaneous interactions with clay, which he began in 2008. Working blindfolded, Mr. Sui creates 10 to 15 sculptures in clay and then chooses the best ones to be enlarged digitally and cast in bronze.
The works going on view at the plaza may at first look like giant, tactile lumps, but on closer inspection each has a form reminiscent of human features. The sculptures are in stark contrast to the politically charged work he is better known for, like his “Mao Jacket" and “Dinosaur” series, which are both responses to the Cultural Revolution.
This is the first time these works have been shown in the United States. “About 10 years ago I saw one of his ‘Mao Jackets’ outside of the Asia Society,” Mr. Baume said. “And I have been fascinated by his development as an artist.”
by Carol Vogel, The New York Times
________________________________________________________________
On a smaller scale, a selection of Sui Jianguo’s discreet “Blind” sculptures are currently on view at L.A. Louver through October 18. Click here to read a recent review of the show in the L.A. Times.
IMAGE: Sui Jianguo, Blind Portraits, 2013, cast bronze, 200.79 x 62.99 x 70.87 in. (510 x 160 x 180 cm) 

L.A. LouverReblogged from L.A. Louver

lalouver:

CENTRAL PARK SHOWCASE FOR CHINESE SCULPTOR

The Doris C. Freedman Plaza, at the entrance to Central Park on Fifth Avenue at 60th Street, is becoming something of a United Nations for artists. Over the years the plaza has been a temporary home to sculptural installations by German and Brazilian artists. There have also been examples of work by well-known figures from England, Poland and Japan. Now a sculptor from China will occupy the plaza — a first, according to Nicholas Baume, director and chief curator of the Public Art Fund.

From Oct. 28 through Feb. 20, four monumental bronze sculptures by the Beijing-based artist Sui Jianguo will command that space. The works, called “Blind Portraits,” are part of a series from his spontaneous interactions with clay, which he began in 2008. Working blindfolded, Mr. Sui creates 10 to 15 sculptures in clay and then chooses the best ones to be enlarged digitally and cast in bronze.

The works going on view at the plaza may at first look like giant, tactile lumps, but on closer inspection each has a form reminiscent of human features. The sculptures are in stark contrast to the politically charged work he is better known for, like his “Mao Jacket" and “Dinosaur” series, which are both responses to the Cultural Revolution.

This is the first time these works have been shown in the United States. “About 10 years ago I saw one of his ‘Mao Jackets’ outside of the Asia Society,” Mr. Baume said. “And I have been fascinated by his development as an artist.”

by Carol Vogel, The New York Times

________________________________________________________________

On a smaller scale, a selection of Sui Jianguo’s discreet “Blind” sculptures are currently on view at L.A. Louver through October 18. Click here to read a recent review of the show in the L.A. Times.

IMAGE: Sui Jianguo, Blind Portraits, 2013, cast bronze, 200.79 x 62.99 x 70.87 in. (510 x 160 x 180 cm)